Category Archives: Road Asset Management

LONDON HAS THE ROAD NETWORK OF A THIRD WORLD COUNTRY

News that the local road maintenance backlog in London is now over £1bn should sound a warning bell for the government. Continued funding cutbacks and decades of lack of investment in local road maintenance means that some areas of London, the capital of a first world city, have the road network more suited to a third world country said the Road Surface Treatments Association (RSTA).

The latest ‘State of the city’ survey, carried out by Atkins on behalf of London Councils and the London Technical Advisers Group, has found that the total maintenance backlog is estimated to be £1.02bn up from £907m. The survey covers the roads managed by London’s boroughs who manage 95% of the capital’s roads.

“The problem is not just a lack of funding, but a lack of funding consistency and predictability,” said Mike Harper, RSTA chief executive. “The current network spend is £300m a year against a need to spend at least £350m a year. Despite increased asset management and cost efficiencies London’s highway authorities are fighting a losing battle. Highway professionals want to follow the new code of practice, ‘Well Managed Highways’ as well as implement industry recommendations but the annual funding allocation, occasionally topped-up by spot-funding at odd times of the year, does not allow the planning required for good asset management. This is necessary for planning the right road surface treatments in the right places at the right time of year in order to maximise the life of roads in the most cost effective way.”

London councils expect government core funding to reduce by 63% in real terms over the decade to 2020. They have to fund the maintenance of their roads from budgets that are shrinking and, as they are not ring-fenced, are subject to being ransacked to pay for other council services.

“Years of under-funding means that despite their best efforts councils are unable to halt the continued deterioration of the London roads. The resulting rutted, potholed network is more third world than the capital of the worlds’ fifth largest economy,” said Harper. “The roads surface industry knows how to achieve better results than this. What we need is a five year settlement for local roads, similar to that used for the national road network. This would allow our highway engineers to deliver the improved road network that Londoners need and have a right to expect.”

PREDICTIONS OF COLD WINTER ARE BAD NEWS FOR LOCAL ROADS

Predictions of the coldest winter for eight years could prove to be bad news for the local road network. The Weather Company is predicting Britain’s worst winter since 2010-11 with temperatures falling to -21C. Exacta Weather are predicting a colder than average December with widespread snow. Meanwhile, the Met Office also believes that a predicted El Nino warming of the eastern Pacific could result in colder than usual temperatures in December and January. This is bad news for those highway authorities who have failed to properly maintain their road networks and for the motorists who use them warns the Road Surface Treatments Association (RSTA).

“A cold icy winter will have a detrimental impact upon our roads resulting in more potholes, particularly where local authority highway departments have not carried out proper road maintenance programmes”, warned Howard Robinson, RSTA chief executive.

Potholes are caused by water or snow freezing in cracks in the road surface. The expansion of ice results in damage and breaking up of the road surface which is made worse by repeated freeze-thaw cycles. Budget constraints mean that many highway authorities are unable to carry out planned, comprehensive maintenance and are forced to adopt an expensive patch-and-mend approach.

Robinson called upon the government to provide local authorities with the necessary assured funding to carry out road maintenance: “Patch-and-mend defies economic logic”, said Robinson. “It costs only £2m2 to surface dress and maintain a road but costs on average £52m2 to repair potholes. Expensive, emergency patch and mend repair of potholes is not a sensible use of highway budgets.”

A prolonged cold winter with cycles of freezing and thawing will be bad news for vulnerable roads. The government needs to provide the necessary funding to allow local authorities to invest in programmes of planned maintenance and so ensure that their road network is weather resilient”.

NEW ASSET MANAGEMENT GROUP FOR LOCAL ROADS

A new Asset Management Group has been set-up by the Road Surface Treatments Association (RSTA). Aimed at local authorities, the Group will allow their highway departments to share best practice linked to the now mandatory Code of Practice – Well Managed Highway Infrastructure. The Code calls for a change in the way that road network is managed through the adoption of a risk-based approach. 

The Group has been established in partnership with XAIS Ltd, an asset management consultancy. It will develop and run a series of new courses on road surfaces and setting investigatory levels linked to road hierarchies. 

The first of these courses is on skid resistance. It will specifically focus on section B.5.6 of the Code and the recommendations for skid resistant surveys including setting the hierarchy, responsibilities, timescales and collating evidence. The course will examine how to develop a skid resistant strategy, how to measure skid resistance as well as the legal implications and liability risk. 

The two-day skid resistance course will run on 4/5th October in Wolverhampton, 17/18th October in Milton Keynes, 15/16th November in Bristol and 4/5th December in Doncaster. For registration and further information visit: www.rsta-uk.org or email: enquiries@rsta-uk.org 

“The new group will enable local authorities to take the best approach towards adopting asset management and we encourage them to join”, said Howard Robinson, RSTA chief executive. “Given that, according to Department for Transport statistics, 27% of local roads need further investigation of possible inadequate skid resistance, the course on skid resistance and investigatory limits and road hierarchies will provide highway departments with the knowledge of how to meet their legal responsibilities via a risk-based approach.”