BLACKPOOL’S PROJECT AMBER FACILITATES ROAD INNOVATION VIA COLLABORATION

Blackpool Council has launched a new collaborative initiative with the roads surface treatments supply chain. Project Amber is a new roads asset management strategy that aims to involve the supply chain in examining and forwarding innovative road maintenance materials and techniques. It has been launched with the support of the Local Councils Road Innovation Group (LCRIG) and the Roads Surface Treatments Association (RSTA).

Project Amber is a progression of Project 30 which was launched by Blackpool in 2011. This delivered a one-time asset management upgrade that took many of Blackpool’s roads from a red condition to green. The new initiative builds upon this success by proactively intervening, with a range of highway surface treatments at the appropriate time rather than leave roads surfaces to deteriorate to the point where larger scale and more disruptive intervention and reconstruction in required.

A feature of Project Amber is the invitation to the supply chain to actively view the conditions of roads in twelve selected wards within Blackpool and then forward proposals for solutions. This is supported by the use of Gaist survey and mapping advanced technology that provides detailed knowledge and understanding of how the roads infrastructure is performing.

Project Amber is the first LCRIG site trial which will be viewed and monitored by other Councils and the Department for Transport.

Will Britain, Head of highways and traffic management at Blackpool Council, said: “Project Amber will forward collaboration with the supply chain and the development and implementation of innovative solutions. In addition, via LCRIG, it will allow other local council highway authorities to tap into the knowledge and resources of the supply chain. Such collaboration will optimise the use of resources and funding.”

Project Amber will see the use of innovative techniques and materials to repair and maintain roads. The treatments will take account of what stage the road surface is in its lifecycle. This means that roads that are still in fairly good condition will be treated to preserve their condition thus preventing deterioration in mid-life. “It’s all about using the right treatment, in the right place, at the right time and at the right cost,” said Britain.

Mike Harper, RSTA chief executive, said: “This is an ideal opportunity for our members to work with Blackpool to keep its roads in optimum condition. The prudential borrowing of funds by Blackpool for a one-time upgrade was a bold move. This is the next step to ensure that they remain in good condition.”

Collaboration is key to the success of Project Amber. This was underlined by Paula Claytonsmith, managing director of Gaist, who said: “We have worked with Blackpool Council for nearly ten years and are pleased to continue to support their latest high profile innovation. We have opened our detailed damage analysis and systems to all those who attended the launch as part of our ongoing commitment to support right place, right time treatments.”

The project has gained the attention of the Department for Transport. Steve Berry, Head of local roads at the Department for Transport, said: “We hope that Project Amber will act as a showcase of what can be achieved by local authorities working in partnership with the supply chain to achieve lower whole life costs in highway maintenance through the use of surface treatments.”